Additional Information

Additional Information

1. How much evidence – and what kind of evidence – is sufficient? When selecting evidence for your claims, make choices that are clear and convincing, but don’t feel that you need to support each line with three different pieces of evidence. For example:

  • If you claim a high emphasis on element A1.1, then you might support that claim with a document describing such a design experience supported by photographic evidence of teachers engaged in all relevant steps of the process, images taken from the teachers’ engineering design notebooks, and documentation of their design communication artifacts.
  • By contrast, if you claim a high emphasis on elements A1.2, then you might support that claim with a video recording showing participants engaging in a facilitated process to develop a clear and concise problem statement for a given design challenge.

 

2. How should I provide my evidence? All evidence should be made available through an online file sharing application (e.g., dropbox, google docs, youtube, vimeo). When you cite your evidence, include a clickable link to each piece of evidence so that application reviewers can go straight to the file that supports your claim.

  • If your evidence is a document describing a design experience supported by photographic evidence of teachers engaged in all relevant steps of the process, images taken from the teachers’ engineering design notebooks, and documentation of their design communication artifacts, then you might: (1) create a single pdf that includes all of these elements; (2) upload that pdf document to a dropbox folder; and (3) provide a link to that file – not the general dropbox folder, but the specific file – in your self-rating table.
  • If your evidence is a video recording showing participants engaging in a facilitated process to develop a clear and concise problem statement for a given design challenge, then you might: (1) upload your video recording to vimeo; and (2) provide a link to that recording in yoru self-rating table. Be sure to note the time stamp at which reviewers should look for specific things.

 

3. What should I keep in mind with respect to video evidence? Video footage must meet the following requirements:

  • Videos should be uploaded to an online video sharing website such as YouTube or Vimeo. The privacy setting should be set to “unlisted” or “password protected” to ensure that outside individuals will not be able to view your videos. If you have your videos password-protected, be sure to include your password as part of your evidence statement so that ASEE reviewers can view your videos. Failure to include passwords or functioning links to your video evidence will result in your application being denied.
  • You must include at least three different video segments as part of your application.
  • You must include a total of at least 1 hour of video evidence but not greater than 3 hours of video footage to support all of your claims for Standards A-E. Each video segment should:
    • Be the original footage taken during the PD training or instructional delivery. The segment should not be altered using digital editing software and should truthfully represent the actions and interactions that occurred during that portion of the professional development program .   You may add title screens just prior to a video segment to clarify the purpose of the segment as evidence for the application but such title screens are NOT required.
    • Provide adequate “before” and “after” footage to allow the reviewers to have a clear understanding of the context of the events shown in the video.   Video segments are suggested to be at least 5 minutes in length.
    • Be digestible by the reviewer. For this reason, ASEE strongly recommends that video segments last for no more than 45 minutes and that longer segments include multiple timestamps to allow reviewers to find the specific evidence that supports your claim.
  • One video segment can be used for multiple pieces of evidence for different parts of the application. Each reference for a specific piece of evidence must include the timestamp of where that evidence is demonstrated within the specified video segment.